The spiritual matrix

This is a very personal view, but I am excited about the maturity that seems to be emerging in the new-age movement. At its core, I see ‘new ageism’ as the drive to bring love into the world in a simple but pure form, an attempt to transmute all that is not love through an open heart.

This is fine to a point, but by rejecting or battling against all that is not love, we are energising a world of duality, of right and wrong. In many ways, this achieves the very opposite of what the movement is all about, as it polarises energy into different camps, which by their very nature create separation and discord. Those who are not prepared to embrace the darkness inside themselves can deny their deepest healing potential and live in a world of fear where constant protection is needed against the powers of the dark outside them. You could call this duality the ‘matrix’, a battleground if we choose to see it that way.

In this new growing sense of maturity, I am seeing many more articles about the need to embrace our shadows, to work with the light and dark together, recognising them as the building blocks of our Universe. When we embrace our shadow and our fears, we disempower them and take away the power of duality, of taking sides, of right and wrong, of good and evil. The matrix itself must then crumble. As Rumi said “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I’ll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass the world is too full to talk about.”

The second area that excites me is the growing questioning of just how far the matrix extends. Personally, and this is a matter of faith clearly, I believe that the matrix extends into the astral realms of spirit. Re-incarnation, Karmic debt, even heaven and hell, are all belief systems. Buddhism talks about Samsara and transcending the wheel of suffering; Christians believe Christ died for our sins, to release us from our suffering so that we may live in the grace of that salvation.

I write this only to challenge you to see where you stand on these issues. Do you agree? Does it bring up outrage or other emotions? For me, there is no greater topic of discussion than how we live our lives and what we aspire to achieve or become, if anything.

With blessings

Andrew Kemp